WORKSHOP SESSIONS

Workshops will be offered on Tuesday, August 16 and Wednesday, August 17.

Participants can attend three workshops on each day.

EXCEPTION: The two-part Functional Fitness workshop is considered two workshops; the three-part Medical Directors Course is considered three workshops.

Additionally, registrants selecting the Fire Ground Survival Practical Workshop attend only three workshops on Tuesday or Wednesday, depending on which day they are assigned to attend the Fire Ground Survival Practical Workshop.

The Fire Ground Survival Practical Workshop is an all-day Workshop that will be offered on Tuesday, August 16 and on Wednesday, August 17. Space is limited and requires the registrant to bring their own personal protective equipment (turn-out coat and pants, hood, gloves, boots and helmet).  Workshop limit is 200 registrants each day. Attend all day Tuesday or Wednesday instead of workshops.


EXCEPTION: Registrants selecting the two-part Electric Vehicle Safety or Functional Fitness workshop which are considered two workshops and/or the registrants selecting the three-part Medical Directors Course which is considered three workshops.


Pick either all day Tuesday or Wednesday

HS-O-A:  FIRE GROUND SURVIVAL PRACTICAL WORKSHOP

The IAFF Fire Ground Survival (FGS) Program is the most comprehensive survival skills and MAYDAY prevention program currently available within the fire service. Incorporating federal regulations, proven incident management best practices and survival techniques from leaders in the field, and real case studies from experienced fire fighters, the FGS program aims to educate all fire fighters to be prepared if the unfortunate happens. This program will train fire fighters to perform potentially life-saving actions if they become lost, disoriented, injured, low on air, or trapped. IAFF Fire Ground Survival instructors will provide an overview of this 32-hour certification course and allow attendees to participate in several of the practical training evolutions including:

  • Disentanglement – learn and practice the latest techniques to avoid becoming entangled and the skills to free yourself should you become entangled.

  • Low Profile – learn and practice the latest techniques for maneuvering through narrow opening including breached walls.

  • Upper-floor Egress – learn and practice the latest techniques to escape from upper floors with the minimum equipment.

Registrants are required to bring their own personal protective equipment (turn-out coat and pants, hood, gloves, boots and helmet).

The nature of the activities in the Fire Ground Survival Practical Workshop requires mental judgment and a high degree of physical fitness, agility, and dexterity. This training program includes strenuous exercise in varying environmental conditions, which requires physical fitness, strength, and stamina and involves the risk of injury or death. The IAFF will not provide medical or health insurance coverage to anyone during any aspect of this workshop. ALL participants MUST sign a waiver prior to participation in this workshop.

 

HS-OO-A: Electric Vehicle Safety Workshop


Some of the risks emergency responders face while operating on the scene of a motor vehicle crash are well known, but the emergence of hybrid and electric vehicles (EVs) has created additional hazards and challenges that must be considered. Recent studies predict there will be more than one million EVs on the road by 2015. This interactive workshop will address emergency response needs for alternative energy vehicles, including safe response and required extrication and training considerations. This workshop will begin with an overview of the NFPA Electric Vehicle Safety Training Initiative, featuring an inside look at the technology and safety systems for Hybrids and EVs. The Overview will be followed by a synopsis of the Chevrolet Volt safety features that will include considerations for responding to a motor vehicle crash involving an extended range electric Chevrolet Volt. The workshop will provide a detailed look at the Volt's electrical system, as well as a brief presentation focused on crash information provided by OnStar. The workshop will conclude with a live extrication demonstration that will highlight both the critical differences and similarities in extrication techniques necessary when responding to emergencies involving EVs.

Tuesday Workshops (Pick 3)

   HS-1-A:  Residential Fireground Field Experiments 

In a landmark study, the National Institute for Science and Technology (NIST) and coalition partners investigated the effects of varying crew size, first apparatus arrival time and response time on fire fighter safety. The results of the study show the differences in time for overall task completion on the fireground based on crew size, as well as the effects of time-to-critical tasks on fire growth and interior structural tenability. The study was conducted on a low-hazard residential structure and the results proved compelling for departments with two-, three-, and four-person crews. This workshop will help local affiliate leaders understand the importance of the study’s results and assess where the findings are applicable to their department. Also, participants will learn how to develop a campaign strategy and delivery techniques to effectively convey the message to their members and local decision-makers.

   HS-2-A1:  Functional Fitness (2-Part Series) 

Injuries cost the fire service billions of dollars annually. In this workshop, instructors will discuss movement-based programming that matches the demand of the job. From prevention to performance of the fire ground, back injury is one of the most costly and debilitating injuries that a fire fighter can suffer. What causes back injuries? How can we prevent them? How do you rehabilitate a back when an injury occurs? These are some of the very basic questions that will be addressed during this session. Many back exercise programs are based on the philosophy to enhance range of motion and build strength. But the back follows different rules than the extremities. It rarely conforms to "specificity of training" or "using resistance through range of motion" principles. Often the causes of the back troubles are replicated in the exercises. A progressive training model based on years of research will be introduced during this session that will address the best way to prepare your back for the rigor of fire operations.

   HS-2-A2:  Building Codes:  Making Buildings Safer for Fire Fighters and Residents 

The fire station is our staging area; our work environment is actually the structures to which we respond. Learn how this work environment is created and maintained through building and fire codes. We will discuss how to create a safer work environment through building construction and the codes. Identify how the revised 2012 codes will impact our work environment and use this opportunity to indicate areas of concern for future efforts. This includes IAFF efforts on light-weight trusses, protection of lightweight construction, elevator egress, sprinklers, smoke alarms and green building issues, including photovoltaic systems, polyurethane foam and roof access issues.

   HS-3-A:  Vehicle and Roadway Safety for the First Responder  

Fire fighters face a number of risks as they perform their jobs every day. Some of these risks are well-known and garner a lot of attention. Other risks are more routine and get little of the treatment given to other hazards. In the past few years, the risks faced by fire fighters from vehicle crashes while responding to emergencies and while working at the emergency scene have gotten a significant amount of attention. This workshop will review the best practices while responding to emergencies, and operating at the emergency scene.

   HS-4-A:  Fire Fighter Environment  

Today’s fires are hotter and more dangerous than ever due to the plastics and building construction and the building materials that are fueling them. Learn about the detection and toxic nature of these products of combustion and how to protect yourself from them. The workshop will provide valuable information to interpret fire hazards for both the fire fighters and the medical community and provide the epidemiological effects of fire fighter exposures.

   HS-5-A:  Physical Demands of Fire Fighting

Fire fighting continues to be one of the most dangerous occupations in North America. Research reveals the need for high levels of physical fitness to safely perform this arduous work with intense physical demands.  However, research demonstrates that fire fighting requires greater levels of physical stress than previously expected and may be in excess of current fitness goals. This workshop will reveal the scientific data collected while monitoring fire fighters on the fireground and discuss strategies for preparing for these acute physiological responses and heat stressors during arduous work as well as needs for emergency scene rehabilitation.

 HS-6-A:  Economics of Fire Fighter Wellness

The current economic crisis increases the chance that administrators will look to cut wellness-fitness programs. Administrators are calling for more rigorous use of economic evaluations to guide resource allocation and spending. A number of studies have shown that a well-designed and implemented program provides a favorable Return on Investment (ROI). This program will highlight the cost justification of the WFI and discuss the seven-year Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: Alternative Models' Effects (PHLAME) study health findings and new data on the 10-year study on 600 fire fighters. This workshop will also discuss the necessary cost-effective approach to wellness in today's difficult financial climate.

EM-7-A:  Medical Director Course (3-Part Series)

This workshop is intended to bridge the gap between experienced EMS physicians and their associated fire department leadership from across the nation. The workshop will provide an interactive, problem-based forum presented by a nationally-recognized leader and educator in EMS Medical Direction. The workshop will also cover new 9-1-1 technology that can enhance fire-based EMS system performance.

For a detailed description of this 3-part series, click here.

EM-8-A:  EMS Field Experiments

A new study report issued by the same coalition that participated in the Residential Fireground Field Experiments shows that the size and configuration of an EMS first responder crew and an advanced life support (ALS) crew have a substantial effect on a fire department’s ability to respond to calls for emergency medical service. The study is the first attempt to investigate the effects of varying crew configurations for first responders, the apparatus assignment of ALS personnel, the number of ALS personnel on scene, and the task completion times for ALS level incidents.

EM-9-A:  Fire-Based EMS Case Scenarios

To deliver necessary protection for their respective communities, fire and emergency medical services (EMS) departments require adequate levels of funding for salaries, benefits, training, operating expenses and equipment. With shortfalls in municipal budgets and decreasing government subsidies, it is becoming increasingly difficult for fire and EMS departments to meet greater and more complex demands for their services. Departments must become proactive in the development of alternative funding mechanisms like non-emergency patient transportation, contracted special event coverage, or billing for services exclusive of patient transportation. This workshop examines real case scenarios.

 

Wednesday Workshops (Pick 3)

   HS-1-B:  Occupational Diseases   

An occupational disease takes years to develop. It’s the result of a career of responding to fires and chemical spills; it’s the result of breathing toxic smoke and fumes on the job; it is the response to continuous medical runs or extricating wounded victims at accidents. This workshop will discuss the the toll fire fighting takes on fire fighters' health and will address the screening of fire fighters for early detection, treatment and prevention, as well as addressing novel risk factors related to cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and occupational cancers.

   HS-2-B1:  Functional Fitness (2-Part Series) 
 
Injuries cost the fire service billions of dollars annually. In this workshop, instructors will discuss movement-based programming that matches the demand of the job. From prevention to performance of the fire ground, back injury is one of the most costly and debilitating injuries that a fire fighter can suffer. What causes back injuries? How can we prevent them? How do you rehabilitate a back when an injury occurs? These are some of the very basic questions that will be addressed during this session. Many back exercise programs are based on the philosophy to enhance range of motion and build strength. But the back follows different rules than the extremities. It rarely conforms to "specificity of training" or "using resistance through range of motion" principles. Often the causes of the back troubles are replicated in the exercises. A progressive training model based on years of research will be introduced during this session that will address the best way to prepare your back for the rigor of fire operations.

   HS-2-B2:  Building Codes:  Making Buildings Safer for Fire Fighters and Residents 

The fire station is our staging area; our work environment is actually the structures to which we respond. Learn how this work environment is created and maintained through building and fire codes. We will discuss how to create a safer work environment through building construction and the codes. Identify how the revised 2012 codes will impact our work environment and use this opportunity to indicate areas of concern for future efforts. This includes IAFF efforts on light-weight trusses, protection of lightweight construction, elevator egress, sprinklers, smoke alarms and green building issues, including photovoltaic systems, polyurethane foam and roof access issues.

   HS-3-B:  Infectious Disease  

Fire Fighters, by nature of their contact with the public, are in constant danger of exposure to many infectious diseases. MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus) is a serious, potentially life-threatening infection that has become a serious threat to first responders. The emergence of novel flu viruses further demonstrates the critical need for departments to prepare for a pandemic flu event. Attendees will learn about common infectious diseases that can affect the health and safety of you and your family, including the symptoms, prevention and transmission methods and treatment options for specific diseases. It will also address the new Ryan White HIV/AIDS Treatment Extension Act’s notification requirements after exposure of emergency response employees to potentially life-threatening infectious diseases.

   HS-4-B:  Behavioral Wellness:  Mental Aspects of Performance   

Traditionally in the Fire Service, medical and physical fitness have been prioritized above emotional or behavioral wellness. However, it is clear from the aftermath of 9/11, Oklahoma City, Hurricane Katrina, and other disasters that these priorities are now changing. Research shows that fire fighters who balance physical, behavioral and emotional wellness have the best outcomes, whether one is looking at adjustment to becoming a fire fighter, ratings of career satisfaction, family well-being, or adjustment to retirement. This workshop will focus on the latest EAP coping and support system mechanisms; how your department must address behavioral health issues that have led to suicide; how we can protect our own by implementing new programs to address the act of suicide; and overcome the avoidance and stigma when it comes to one of our own taking their own life.

   HS-5-B:  Fire Service Communications:  Why They Are Not Working

The flow of information between fire fighters and fire officers is imperative to fire ground safety. An effective communications system requires proper planning and training at the front end and there is no one better to participate than fire fighters who must understand and be involved in the process of developing a new radio communication system in their jurisdiction. Discussions will address national issues surrounding D-Block, the nationwide, interoperable broadband network available to first responders, as well as funding, training, trouble-shooting and implementation of such systems to standards and requirements for fire fighters so they can respond safely and effectively.

   HS-6-B:  Operating Safely:  Protective Clothing and Equipment 

An examination of current issues surrounding fire fighter's personal protective clothing and equipment, including new research, product demonstrations and purchasing strategies to obtain the best gear for your members. This workshop will address emerging technologies in the area of PPE, emerging PPE capabilities, standards, and next-generation SCBA, clothing and selection tools.

   EM-7-B:  Staying Competitive in Ambulance Transport 

When the economy is good, support of the fire department is usually high. However, when the economy makes a downward turn, local decision makers must make tough choices. This workshop is intended to prepare fire service leaders with the information and tools necessary to compete when threatened by privatization.

   EM-8-B:  Fire and EMS Operations in Canada

This workshop is intended to present fire-based EMS models as well as provide an update on ambulance resource problems, including excessive response times and service blackouts that are plaguing a number of Canadian cities. This workshop will also focus on efforts at the provincial level to urge government officials to consider utilizing the existing resources of fire departments to address these ongoing problems.

   EM-9-B:  Marketing a Fire-Based System

This workshop is intended to teach participants how to market fire-based EMS response as one of the essential public safety functions provided by the fire service in support of community health, security and prosperity. Participants will learn how to use the attributes of fire-based EMS to protect or enhance current service provisions. In this time of economic crisis, as federal, state, and local governments contemplate cutbacks and downsizing, their strategic plan should consider an "all hazards" emergency response system and fire-based EMS should be included in those considerations.

*Schedule is subject to change due to speaker availability and scheduling conflict.

Attention Certified Peer Fitness Trainers and EMS Personnel:
IAFF/IAFC/ACE certified PFTs are eligible to earn CEUs for attending the health, safety and EMS Conference. There are also workshops that PFTs can take to earn additional CEUs. Contact the IAFF for more information. EMTs and Paramedics are eligible for CE credit for several workshops offered. These CEUs will be awarded by Kaplan Continuing Education and will be approved by the Continuing Education Coordinating Board for EMS (CECBEMS). See workshop agenda onsite for qualifying workshops.