WORKSHOPS

Workshops will be offered on Friday, August 23 and Saturday, August 24.

Registrants can choose to attend two workshops and one information session on Friday, August 23 and four workshops on Saturday August 24.

EXCEPTION: The two-part Functional Fitness workshop and the Fire Behavior Research workshop are each considered two workshops. The Medical Directors Course part 1 and 2 is considered two workshops and the Medical Directors Course part 3 and Interactive Session is considered two workshops.


Friday August 23, 2013: Workshops (Select 2)

 Carbon Monoxide: EMS Response to Fireground Incidents

This information session is aimed at educating fire fighters about the duty-related dangers of carbon monoxide (CO) and reducing known risk factors that unnecessarily kill and injure hundreds of fire fighters each year. The session will also provide appropriate EMS response to these events.

Consultants and EMS System Design

This workshop is intended to assess consultant reports delivered in various communities throughout the U.S. and Canada, identifying patterns in system design recommendations. Presenters will discuss key indicators used to measure efficacy and necessary information for rebutting harmful reports.

 Fire-Based EMS Case Scenarios


To deliver necessary protection for their respective communities, Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Departments require adequate levels of funding for salaries, benefits, training, operating expenses and equipment. With shortfalls in municipal budgets and decreasing government subsidies, it is becoming increasingly difficult for fire and EMS departments to meet greater and more complex demands for their services. To meet the critical needs of the community, departments must become proactive in the development of alternative funding mechanisms. Some of these alternatives include non-emergency patient transportation, contracted special event coverage, or billing for services exclusive of patient transportation. This workshop examines real case scenarios.

 Fire-Based EMS Operations in Canada

This workshop is intended to present fire-based EMS models, as well as provide an update on ambulance resource problems including excessive response times and service blackouts that are plaguing a number of Canadian cities.  The workshop will also focus on efforts at the provincial level to urge government officials to consider utilizing the existing resources of fire departments to address these ongoing problems.

 NIST and UL Research: Studying Fire Behavior and Fireground Tactics Part 1 and 2 

Over the past several years, the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL) have been working together with the fire service to examine fire dynamics and fire fighting tactics. More than a hundred experiments have examined the changes in the fire environment over time, impact of ventilating ventilation limited fires, implications of flow control and effectiveness in suppression tactics. These experiments were conducted with fire fighters from across the country from departments of different types, with varying levels of staffing, resources and operating procedures. The NIST and UL studies have produced tactical considerations that have become common themes over several studies which may change the way you view your standard operating guidelines.

 Building Codes: Your Work Environment Needs the Proper Protection - Your Life Depends On It

The fire fighter’s work environment is the structures to which they respond. Learn how this work environment is designed, built and maintained through building and fire codes. We will discuss how to create a safer work environment through building construction and building fire codes. Identify how the revised and proposed building and fire codes will impact our work environment and use this opportunity to indicate areas of concern for future efforts. This includes IAFF efforts on light-weight trusses, protection of lightweight construction, elevator egress, sprinklers, smoke alarms, and green building issues including photovoltaic systems, polyurethane foam and roof access issues. Learn how to be proactive in the model code arena and influence how “these structures” will react in the event of a fire to further protect the safety and health of our members.

  Fire Service Communications: Why They Are Not Working  

The life safety of both first responders and citizens depends on reliable, functional communication tools that work in the harshest and most hostile of environments. Fire fighters operate in extreme environments that are markedly different from those of any other radio users. Fire fighters operate lying on the floor; in zero visibility, high heat, high moisture, and wearing self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) facepieces that distort the voice. EMS workers often operate inside of building and homes where the structure itself affects their ability to transmit and receive critical life-saving information. Discussions will address the current challenges and solutions in emergency communications as well as national issues surrounding the nationwide, interoperable broadband network available to first responders as well as funding, staffing, training, testing, trouble-shooting and implementation of such systems to standards and requirements for fire fighters so they can respond safely and effectively.

  Functional Fitness - Balancing the Physical Demands with Human Capacity Part 1 and 2  

Injuries cost the fire service billions of dollars annually. In this workshop instructors will discuss the latest research in movement-based programming that matches the demands of the job. Learn about the various tools to determine potential problem areas, prevent injuries, increase functional training, and increase performance efficiency. From prevention to performance of the emergency scene, back injury is one of the most costly and debilitating injuries that a first responder can suffer. What causes back injuries? How can we prevent them? How do you rehabilitate a back when an injury occurs? These are some of the very basic questions that will be addressed during this session. A progressive training model based on years of research will be introduced during this session that will address the best way to prepare your back for the rigor of fire operations.

  Respiratory Protection

A fire fighter’s SCBA is one of the most important items of personal protective equipment (PPE). This session will enhance your knowledge and proficiency of use of your SCBA. It will address daily pre-use inspection and also weekly, monthly, and annual performance checks, flow tests, bench tests, overhaul and manufacturer warranty and recommended periodic maintenance actions. It will address hands-on practical application exercise where you fully evaluate the SCBA under full pressure for the duration of the User instruction manual pre-operational, operational, and functions check sequence.

 PSO - Public Safety Officers: Knowing the Facts

Combining roles of fire fighters and police officers is a concept that challenges and undermines the career fire fighter’s role as a guardian of public safety. Today, when faced with the pressure to decrease budgets, city managers may be more easily tempted by the argument that consolidation can cut costs, even if that argument is unfounded. Leaders can make their strongest arguments in support of a separate fire department when you know the facts that support your position—and are knowledgeable of the opposition’s arguments. The information presented in this workshop will help develop a position based on facts about PSO organizations from an academic and experience bases.

Saturday August 24, 2013: Morning Workshops (Select 2)

 Hot Topics in EMS (Part 1 and 2)  (* Formerly known as the EMS Medical Director Course)

This workshop is intended to bridge the gap between experienced EMS physicians and fire department leadership from across the nation. Presented by nationally-recognized leaders and educators in EMS Medical Direction, the workshop will provide an interactive, problem-based forum delivered in a series of energetic lightning rounds. The workshop will also cover contemporary research and technological advances that can enhance fire-based EMS system performance. Subjects presented in each session are new and will not be repeated.

For detailed class description and agenda click here.

 Fire-Based EMS: Explaining the Benefits to Policy Makers & Tax Payers

When the economy is good, support of the fire department is usually high. However, when the economy makes a downward turn, local decision makers must make tough choices. This workshop is intended to prepare fire service leaders with the information and tools necessary to show that fire-based EMS is an essential public safety function provided by the fire service in support of community health, security and prosperity.

 Fire Fighter Safety and Deployment: EMS Integration Models

This workshop will present real case scenarios in Fire-based EMS integration. From cross-trained/multirole to single role transport within the fire department, EMS system design must be based on community needs and expectations for response. This workshop will consider response, on scene care, and transport as well as discuss fire-based EMS relationships with private ambulance companies where they exist.

 Functional Fitness - Balancing the Physical Demands with Human Capacity (Part 1 and 2)   

Injuries cost the fire service billions of dollars annually. In this workshop instructors will discuss the latest research in movement-based programming that matches the demands of the job. Learn about the various tools to determine potential problem areas, prevent injuries, increase functional training, and increase performance efficiency. From prevention to performance of the emergency scene, back injury is one of the most costly and debilitating injuries that a first responder can suffer. What causes back injuries? How can we prevent them? How do you rehabilitate a back when an injury occurs? These are some of the very basic questions that will be addressed during this session. A progressive training model based on years of research will be introduced during this session that will address the best way to prepare your back for the rigor of fire operations.

 NIST and UL Research: Studying Fire Behavior and Fireground Tactics (Part 1 and 2) 
 
Over the past several years, the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL) have been working together with the fire service to examine fire dynamics and fire fighting tactics. More than a hundred experiments have examined the changes in the fire environment over time, impact of ventilating ventilation limited fires, implications of flow control and effectiveness in suppression tactics. These experiments were conducted with fire fighters from across the country from departments of different types, with varying levels of staffing, resources and operating procedures. The NIST and UL studies have produced tactical considerations that have become common themes over several studies which may change the way you view your standard operating guidelines.  

 Behavioral Wellness 

Early efforts of the fire service to manage impacts of stressful events on the job paved the way for much research and information now available regarding occupational exposure to traumatic events. Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD) was widely adopted in the fire service. Widespread use led to rigorous investigation of intervention efficacy by independent researchers in psychology, psychiatry, and public health. Authoritative guidelines for early interventions following exposure to traumatic events now recommend against routine debriefing or other procedures incorporating debriefing-like assumptions and approaches. This workshop will discuss the latest research and programs for addressing traumatic stress, the changes to NFPA 1500 and the components of Stress First Aid.

 Burn Injuries - It Happened in Seconds  

Extreme heat and flames are occupational hazards of fire fighting that cannot be controlled or minimized by typical workplace safety methods. Fire fighters must rely on their personal protective equipment (PPE) to reduce the risk of burn injuries from exposure to fire. However, the use of PPE does not guarantee 100% protection from these hazards, and fire fighters continue to suffer burn injuries on the fire ground. According to the NFPA, over 12% of all reported injuries in the fire service in 2011 were a result of thermal stress or burns. The goal of this workshop is to discuss the full nature of burn injuries and the recovery process; specifically the major causes of burns, where to seek proper treatment, and burn injury rehabilitation. Attendees will learn how improved situational awareness and fire ground survival skills can help reduce their risk of sustaining a burn injury. The limitations and proper utilization of PPE will also be discussed. Finally, attendees will learn how to build and sustain relationships with local burn units, which help both fire fighter and civilian burn victims get the specialized care they need to make a full recovery.

 Emergency Vehicle Safety - How to Protect Yourself While Serving Others   

Emergency vehicle safety is a workplace hazard that is often overlooked in many departments. The risks associated with traffic incidents can be seen as routine and a normal part of a first responder’s job. However, the number of first responder injuries and fatalities associated with vehicle crashes while responding to emergencies and while working at the emergency scene continues to increase. Traffic incident management (TIM) is a planned and coordinated program to detect and remove incidents and restore traffic capacity as safely and quickly as possible. Over time, various tools and strategies have been developed and implemented to improve overall TIM efforts. This workshop will review the best practices while responding to emergencies, and operating at the emergency scene. We will also describe task-specific and cross-cutting issues or challenges commonly encountered by traffic incident responders in the performance of their duties, as well as new and effective strategies for overcoming these challenges.

 Sleep and the Truth About Shift Schedules and Performance 

Shiftwork is usually defined as any work that occurs outside of normal business hours. As we all know, our normal business hours are 24 hours a day. According to IAFF data, most fire fighters work 24 hour shifts, although some departments follow a different rotating shift system. There are volumes of literature dealing with shiftwork and its effects on health, the optimum type of shift schedule and information on individual differences in tolerating shiftwork, but what does this research say about fire fighters? This workshop will summarize pertinent information on the health effects of shiftwork for fire fighters and discuss coping strategies. This workshop will also chronicle the history of the 24-hour shift and will investigate the challenges of negotiating the shift, dealing with objections raised by administration and highlight arbitration hearings that have taken place concerning the 24 hour shift and the use of expert witnesses.

 NIOSH Fire Fighter Cancer Study

NIOSH is currently working on a groundbreaking cancer research project that will help us better understand the link between firefighting and cancer. With more than 30,000 career fire fighters who served in the Chicago, Philadelphia, and San Francisco Fire Departments between 1950 and 2010, it is the largest study of United States fire fighters ever undertaken. This study not only looked at deaths from cancer, but also at diagnoses of certain kinds of cancer that have higher survival rates, such as testicular and prostate cancer. This study also took into account the number and type of fire runs made (for example, EMS and vehicle fire), the use of personal protective equipment, and diesel exhaust controls. This workshop will discuss the risk for various cancers and illnesses among fire fighters compared to the general public.

 Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) - Safety and Tactics (Part 1 and 2)

Pre-fire planning across agencies to establish vegetative management, priorities, evacuation routes, and other essential procedures saves lives and valuable time in a real fire event. This workshop will discuss effective responses to WUI fires and the swift and coordinated action required by all available fire fighters and other emergency responders. This workshop will also discuss how fire fighters can prepare themselves for structure protection activities by developing a sound understanding of the wildland structure environment, fire behavior, and fire forecasting to improve survivability and reduce loss.

Saturday August 24, 2013: Afternoon Workshops (Select 2)

 Hot Topics in EMS (Part 3 and Interactive Session)  (* Formerly known as the EMS Medical Director Course)

This workshop is intended to bridge the gap between experienced EMS physicians and fire department leadership from across the nation. Presented by nationally-recognized leaders and educators in EMS Medical Direction, the workshop will provide an interactive, problem-based forum delivered in a series of energetic lightning rounds. The workshop will also cover contemporary research and technological advances that can enhance fire-based EMS system performance. Subjects presented in each session are new and will not be repeated.

For detailed class description and agenda click here.

 EMS Delivery and the Affordable Care Act

This workshop is intended to teach participants how to market fire-based EMS response as one of the essential public safety functions provided by the fire service in support of community health, security and prosperity.

 Community Paramedics

This workshop is intended to explain the opportunities for expanded scope of practice for fire-based EMS providers. Presenters will address state laws now in place to enable expanded scope operation in an effort to fulfill community needs. The workshop will also address the reality of opportunities for treat-and-release, as well as alternative transport destinations and opportunities to increase department revenue.

 Suicide Prevention

This workshop will focus on suicide prevention techniques and how to effectively address the behavioral health issues that lead to suicide. Attendees of this workshop will learn about the latest coping and support system mechanisms; how to protect our own by implementing new programs to address the act of suicide; and strategies for overcoming the stigma associated with fire fighter suicide and seeking behavioral health counseling.

 Burn Injuries - Taking Care of Our Own

Although fire fighters face many types of occupational hazards, we are especially at risk for burn injuries. Burns are one of the most devastating injuries inflicted on the body. When a fire fighter suffers burns, the injuries heal, but recovery can take a lifetime. The long-term effects of a burn injury are not just physical. To address the need for support services specific to burn-injured fire fighters and their families the IAFF Burn Foundation and the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation partnered with the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors to develop and provide peer support by fire fighters for fire fighters and their loved ones. This workshop is designed to educate members on the resources available to their members through the IAFF Charitable Foundation-Burn Fund in the unfortunate event of a line of duty burn injury. Workshop is presented through personal stories, video and lecture.

 The Toxic Fire Environment - Giving the "All Clear"

The fire environment is a toxic mix of chemicals that increase the potential of occupational diseases for first responders. Exposures to certain chemicals of concern occur through combustion of household furnishings or insulation that contain chemicals used as flame retardants. This workshop will discuss the latest research and technology for evaluating the post-fire environment. The limitations of multi-gas detection devices; personnel decontamination and PPE laundering and decontamination will also be discussed. This workshop will also review a set of environmental dust and human monitoring studies and how scientific data from such studies is catalyzing policy reform concerning the use of chemical flame retardants, the identification of safer flame retardant alternatives, and other elements of fire safety.

 Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) - Safety and Tactics (Part 1 and 2)

Pre-fire planning across agencies to establish vegetative management, priorities, evacuation routes, and other essential procedures saves lives and valuable time in a real fire event. This workshop will discuss effective responses to WUI fires and the swift and coordinated action required by all available fire fighters and other emergency responders. This workshop will also discuss how fire fighters can prepare themselves for structure protection activities by developing a sound understanding of the wildland structure environment, fire behavior, and fire forecasting to improve survivability and reduce loss.

 Personal Protective Clothing

Is personal protective equipment (PPE) technology giving fire fighters a false sense of security? Are your department’s care and maintenance policies and procedures causing a reduction in your PPE’s ability to protect you? Is your PPE making you sick with diseases like cancer? Fire fighters depend on their personal protective equipment to allow them to perform their jobs safely and effectively. In order for PPE to adequately protect fire fighters from hazards, PPE must be properly utilized, maintained, and stored after use. This workshop will discuss the latest advances in PPE technology as well as the problems and pitfalls of using this technology to the fullest.

 Infectious Diseases - Common Exposures - New Threats - Biological Warfare

IAFF members are routinely exposed to potentially life threatening diseases in the course of their jobs, including MRSA, HIV, Pertussis and many more. In addition to the threat of emerging diseases, first responders must also be aware of and protect themselves from the threat of infectious diseases used as biological warfare agents such as Anthrax. Attendees of this workshop will learn about common infectious diseases that can affect the health and safety of IAFF members and their families including symptoms, prevention, transmission, and treatment options. Several emerging infectious diseases will also be discussed in further detail, including MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus), novel influenza, and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. A review on infection control programs will also be provided to help members learn about proper PPE, disinfection procedures, employee training, vaccinations, and post exposure reporting. This workshop will also discuss the reauthorization of to the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Treatment Extension Act (S.1793), passed by Congress in 2009 and the updates to the Ryan White Life Threatening Disease List and Reporting Guidelines.

 WFI Implementation Strategies

Fire fighters are exposed to numerous chemical, physical, biological and psychosocial hazards, making fire fighting one of the most dangerous occupations. The Wellness-Fitness Initiative (WFI) is a historic collaboration between labor and management to improve the health and wellness of the men and women working in the Fire Service. Where fully implemented, this program has provided a template for standardization of care and integration of various elements into a cohesive clinical program. Without question, the WFI clinical programs have saved lives and improved the quality of life for uniformed personnel in participating municipalities. This workshop will discuss implementation strategies used by two WFI Task Force participants (Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department and IAFF Local 2068; and the Indianapolis Fire Department and IAFF Local 416) and how you can benefit from their success.

 Working to Death - Occupational Diseases - Heart Disease, Respiratory Disease and Cancer

A fire emergency is an uncontrolled environment that is managed by fire fighters using heavy, bulky, and often times, inadequate personal protective equipment. The experience is not only physically demanding, but also involves exposures that are known to cause cancer, heart disease and respiratory disease. This workshop will discuss the toll fire fighting takes on fire fighters' health and will address the screening of fire fighters for early detection, treatment and prevention, as well as addressing novel risk factors related to cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and occupational cancers.

*Schedule is subject to change due to speaker availability and scheduling conflict.

Attention Certified Peer Fitness Trainers and EMS Personnel:
IAFF/IAFC/ACE certified PFTs are eligible to earn Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for attending the health, safety and EMS Conference. There are also workshops that PFTs can take to earn additional CEUs. Contact the IAFF for more information. In order to receive EMS CEUs for approved workshops, conference participants must provide their EMS certification or licensure information. This information should be provided at the time of conference registration and must include a state certification number and expiration date and/or a NREMT number and expiration date. Attendees with incomplete information will not receive CEUs.